The Land of the Motmot: SFS Takes On Nicaragua

Posted: April 2, 2012

Name: Virginia Farley
School: Dickinson College
Major: Environmental Science
Program: Sustainable Development Studies, Costa Rica

The Motmot, Nicaragua’s national bird, is a colorful, striking, and extraordinary example of the wonders we are exposed to in Central America. After spending a fantastic week across the border, I think we can all use such adjectives to describe not only its national symbol, but Nicaragua itself. A serendipitous change of plans led us north as opposed to south to Panama and in retrospect we could not have been happier with the alteration. Our experiences in Nicaragua proved to be the epitome of field studies – volcanoes, lakes, waterfalls, organic farms, more volcanoes, and tumultuous roads were all in plenty. Every adventure in Nicaragua was a reminder of why we are all here and why this program is so unique.

Our international journey was kicked off with a few days spent on the picturesque island of Ometepe. Although requiring a lengthy, and for some, a nauseating venture across Lake Nicaragua, the final destination offered a notable first impression of Nicaragua.  Our remaining days on Ometepe were filled with top notch hikes, guest lecturers, and a whole lot of shockingly gorgeous scenery.  As our ferry departed Ometepe Island, its volcanoes projecting into the skyline, I vowed to someday return to this magnificent place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With nothing but good vibes and big smiles resulting from our stay on Ometepe, we headed off to the city of Granada. This was our first significant exposure to Central American city life and the change of pace was refreshing. The final days in Nicaragua were spent exploring the nearby attractions (mainly more volcanoes) and each new place only added to our already positive opinions of this country.

Colorful, striking, and extraordinary. The Land of the Motmot did not disappoint.